Connect with us

Published

on

  • Qualcomm has announced a new in-display fingerprint sensor. Called the Qualcomm 3D Sonic Sensor, it’s based on ultrasonic imaging technology.

  • Qualcomm’s 3D Sonic Sensor lets phone and watch screens reliably scan fingers

  • 3D Sonic Sensor in-display fingerprint techology is coming to smartphones next year

Qualcomms 3D Sonic fingerprint sensor, it isn’t yet clear how the new solution will be differentiated from Qualcomm’s ultrasonic in-display solution announced in June of 2017, and featured in the Huawei Honor 9 smartphone launched earlier this year. In announcing the 3D Sonic Sensor at this week’s Snapdragon Technology Summit, Qualcomm offered few details; in a statement, the company said only that it’s “the only mobile solution that can accurately detect fingerprints through numerous contaminants,” adding that it “enables sleek, cutting-edge form factors while distinguishing itself from alternatives with higher levels of security and accuracy.”

In any case, the solution’s announcement at the Snapdragon Technology Summit suggests that it’s going to be an important part of Qualcomm’s product portfolio over the coming year, with the company using the event to announce and preview its new Snapdragon 855 Mobile Platform. Qualcomm says the platform will support 5G connectivity, sophisticated AI and computer vision, and Augmented Reality capabilities; it’s the company’s flagship mobile chip platform for 2019, and the company is already positioning the 3D Sonic Sensor alongside it.

In-display fingerprint sensors have emerged this year as a cutting-edge new biometric technology in a small handful of mobile devices from the likes of Vivo, Huawei, and OnePlus, though the most recent devices from the latter brands have used fingerprint sensor technology from Goodix. That firm’s leading position in this area could shift over the coming year, if Qualcomm does indeed commit to the promotion of its newest solution and offers a compelling value proposition.

Vikram Aadi extensively covers Asia's personal device and connected services ecosystem, as well as the intersection of technology and culture. Hit him up on Twitter, or via mail: vikram@thb2.com.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Comments

Business

Google Translate now offers gender-specific translations for some languages

Published

on

By

  • Google Translate will now show gender-specific translations for some languages.

In an effort to reduce gender bias in its translations, Google Translate will now show gender-specific translations for some languages. Previously, Google Translate would only show one translation for words that could either have a feminine or masculine form. Translations for words like “strong” or “doctor” would skew masculine, while “beautiful” and “nurse” would skew feminine. Now, Google Translate will show both feminine and masculine translations for words in select languages.

Google’s been on a mission to promote fairness in AI and machine learning, as demonstrated recently by its initiative to remove gendered pronouns from Gmail’s Smart Compose feature. The company says it’s also thinking about how to address non-binary gender in translations as well as gender bias in other Google products like search auto-complete.

Currently, the gender-specific translations are only available for translating single words from English to romance languages like French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish. Turkish to English is the only language pair that provides both translations for sentences. Google gives an example, seen above, in which typing “o bir doktor” in Turkish will turn up both “she is a doctor” and “he is a doctor.”

The feature currently only works in browsers like Chrome and Firefox, and it will eventually be available on iOS and Android. Google says it’s working to bring support for more languages as well.

Continue Reading

Business

The first 8K satellite TV broadcasts launched in Japan

Published

on

By

As scheduled, at 10 AM local time on December 1st Japanese TV networks began publicly broadcasting 4K and 8K channels via satellite. Even after a couple of years of testing, NHK is currently the only one pushing content at 8K with 22.2 channel sound. The first movie listed in its TV guide is 2001: A Space Odyssey, and the BBC reports that Warner Bros. rescanned the film’s original 70mm negatives specifically for this broadcast.

It’s still early days of course, since almost no one has an 8K display, and most of the people who do need a special receiver and antenna just to pick up the signal. Japan reported that Sharp began selling its first Super Hi-Vision-ready TVs with a built-in tuner last month for around $6,600. Also, HDMI 2.1 hasn’t been implemented in any of these displays yet, so just getting the signal from box to TV requires plugging in four HDMI cables.

We’ve only seen the beginning of a push for 8K this year, but now that there’s actually a channel on the air somewhere it seems likely that things will ramp up next month at CES 2019. In Japan there’s an incentive to get going as quickly as possible in preparation for the 2020 Olympics, but we’ll need to see more information about pricing, content and have a look at the TVs ourselves before we can tell if a resolution upgrade beyond 4K is even worth it.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Whats Going.?

Trending